DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

How are stem cells used?

 

Stem cell therapy is the injecting stem cells into parts of the body that are diseased. Stem cell therapy is used to treat and also prevent some diseases in patients who suffer from cancer, diabetes, and many others.

Stem cells' ability to differentiate into different types of cells could open many doors in therapeutic treatments.

 

 

     Cancer

Patients with breast cancer usually need a mastectomy or lumpectomy prior to getting stem cell therapy. Stem cell therapy is used to avoid chemotherapy. Two types of injecting stem cells are intravenously and through the cerebrospinal fluid; there are also other methods of injecting them. The stem cells that are used can be autologous (which are from the patient) and donor cells  (from a placenta). Bone marrow is taken from the patient, processed in a lab, and the quality and quantity is tested. Then, the stem cells are re implanted intravenously or by spinal tap (lumbar puncture).

      Diabetes

The goal in stem cell therapy in diabetes is to attack the site of the cause, the pancreas. The therapy changes the shape of the pancreas, and "improves the patient's quality of life." The most common way to treat patients is intravenously; the stem cells are injected into the blood, which transports them to the pancreas. They can also be implanted into the pancreas. Bone marrow is taken from the patient, processed in a lab, and the quality and quantity is tested. Then, the stem cells are re implanted into the pancreas either intravenously or surgically.

  

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.